Review of 2016

What with the planet once again at some arbitrary point of it’s trajectory around the sun we’ve picked as significant, I thought I’d share some of the results of photoshoots I’ve done this year. I was not going to be shooting any more than twice a month in 2016 so there aren’t too many to go through.

Some images you may have seen, but I’ll try to pick ones I’ve not shared before. I will be sharing some of these photoshoots in a bit more detail so won’t use up all of the images here.

January

2016 started as it ended, with a photoshoot with Lillith. This time we were in a studio, and we brought Lydia along too.  I knew these two would get along. I was a little daunted initially, not worked with two models before, but with everybody’s creative input into the shoot all went well.

Later in January I have my second photoshoot with one of models who helped me get started, namely Arabella. Arabella is a load of fun to be around, charming and chatty, and has a great line in what she calls “facial erotica”. I’ve been very lax when it comes to editing these images. They seemed to have been in the queue for ages. Hopefully I’ll be able to edit a few more in the coming months.

February

February brought with it a shoot with Scarlett Fox. When you work with Scarlett three things are guaranteed. 1) A lot of chat 2) plenty tea, and 3) and incredibly productive photoshoot due to her strong work ethic. Scarlett obviously puts a lot into her modelling and this is shown in the results.

March

When I first joined PurplePort, and started my journey taking photos of models, there was one name that kept on cropping up, over and over again, mainly to do with the quality of her work, which was always of a very high standard. That name was Artemis Fauna. I knew that I wanted to work with Artemis, but arranging something wasn’t easy due to her busy workload, and my ability to shoot only at weekends. Still, I persevered, a dialogue was opened, and sure enough a chance to work together appeared when Artemis was at Sandon Studio in March.

I have to admit that I was a little nervous about meeting Artemis. I say nervous, it was more awe I guess. Her body of work and reputation in the industry speak for themselves. Why would she want to work with somebody like me?

Well I needn’t have worried. Artemis was a pure delight. Five minutes after meeting we were chatting about focal lengths, aperture values, and shooting modes. I do love it when a model talks nerdy to me.

Later in the month I got some studio time with Purple Princess who had decided that we needed to shoot together. She travelled a long way for the shoot so we made the most of it.

April

April gave me the chance wot work with Sinopa Rin again. I say work, but it never feels like work. It’s always so much fun. No doubt I’ll write a separate post about this shoot at some point, and you’ve already seen one before, so won’t spoil the surprise right now with multiple images, just this one.

Also in April I got to shoot with Harley Monster for the third time. Harley has been a good friend to me, and so she shall remain in my good books for an awfully long time. Harley brought Nina, a whiz stylist and makeup artists along to the shoot. We shall meet Nina’s work again later.

May

May brought with it the spring, and a shoot with Stephanie Dubois. We decided to split out time, half in the studio and half out on location.

This is what we did in the studio.

This is what we did on location.

Second shoot for May was with KRG, back up in Scotland once more. Again, I’ve been a bit rubbish when it comes to getting these images ready. They will come, just not right now.

June

Had my third shoot with Lydia in June. Lydia likes to give the impression that she’s the mean and moody type, but when the camera is not clicking she’s all smiles, laughs, and giggles. A real joy to work with.

Earlier in the year Becky Kvittems and I were discussing the possibility of a second photoshoot after the first went so well. Alas it had to be postponed, and was rearranged for June. It was the middle of the summer so we planned an outdoor shoot, summer dress, sunshine, that kind of thing.

July

I’d been admiring the work of a photographer on PurplePort, so we got chatting about photographic styles. It turns out that this photographer is also a model I knew of, by the name of Marianne Di Vine. We arranged a photoshoot, and Marianne allowed me to use on of her lenses that I’ve been lusting after. How nice was that?

August

After my trepidation about shooting with Artemis Fauna earlier in the year, and it going so well, I jumped at the chance to take even more photos of super amazing Artemis Fauna, this time at Hallam Mill, where we created many different looks in just a few hours. Again, more to come later so just a teaser for now.

At this point I stepped back without looking and sat on a bedpost of one of the studio props. Good job I was wearing thick trousers. Artemis was clearly concerned for my well-being.

September

In September I got to work with make up artist and stylist Nina again. this time she brought Kira Dawn with her, and we created some amazing shots.

Hiring out a studio can be a bit expensive. The facilities are (usually) great, but you’re stuck to working at the times you have booked.

I decided to have a go at creating a home studio in September. I had a white wall, some flashes, light modifiers, and coloured gels. All as I needed now was a pretty girls and some props. I send a message to Katarina and she kindly agreed to model for me.

October

Guess who came back to Manchester in October. If you guessed “Sinopa Rin” then you’d be right. I jumped at the chance to create some more photos with her.

I also got the chance to shoot with KRG again, which was nice.

We started off out on location trying to capture some of the autumn colours.

Next was a trip to the studio for some beauty portraits, which with a model as beautiful as KRG is an easy job.

November

For my second shoot with Stephanie Dubois we were planning a couple of different locations. Unfortunately the British weather was against us so out came the lights again and we just went with the flow, creating as many different looks and lighting styles as the time would allow.

Unfortunately none of these images are finished yet. All as I have are a few back of camera screen grabs that Stephanie took as the shoot went on. I love the photos we created so they will be edited and shared just as soon as they’re ready.

December

Alas there were no photoshoots in December. I’m on a short break from shooting models and my photoshoot with Stephanie was the last for the time being. Hopefully it’ll give me time to catch up on the editing and sharing backlog. I’ve also been practicing indoor studio shots, but with more of a slant to still life than models.

If you got down this far, then thank you so much for reading. Hope you liked the pictures.

Wishing you and those you love a very happy New Year. May all your dreams come true in 2017, especially those you work hard to make happen.

Danny.

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No update

One of my biggest concerns when I started this blog was about me not updating it. I have a reputation, deservedly so, as somebody who is good at getting projects started, but not so great when it comes to finishing them. I didn’t want this to happen with my blog, but with no update for two months it would appear that I’m dangerously close to having another unfinished project left by the wayside.

I don’t want this to happen. My photography has come on leaps and bounds over the past 12 to 18 months, and I have created some wonderful images I’m really proud of.

A little bit of real life has cropped up n my personal circumstances recently which means I do not have a huge amount of time to keep updating this blog continually, but I am determined to keep it going and for it to be a record of my photographic journey. With that I shall upload a few recent images, just to get me back into the swing of things.

Paul
Paul

 

Artemis Fauna
Artemis Fauna
Cinnamon Gaze
Cinnamon Gaze
Harley Monster
Harley Monster
Fat lad inna hat
Fat lad inna hat

5 steps to getting the best from your model

One of the models I’ve worked with, Sinopa Rin, recently created a blog post titled “5 steps to getting the best from your model“. What can a photographer learn from a model? Well quite a lot actually. Her post struck such a chord with me that I decided to write this post as a direct response, but from the photographer’s point of view.

Admittedly I have little experience, time wise, working with models. My first photoshoot, yes with Ms Rin, was a little under a year ago. However, in that time I have managed to squeeze in 35 photoshoots, working with 27 different models along the way, and feel that I have picked up a few hints and tips for a mutually beneficial working relationship that I will share with you now.

1. Treat the model with dignity and respect at all times

This is incredibly important, hence the position at number one in my list. Something you shouldn’t need telling, but alas it would appear that some people need to have this spelled out to them.

Of course you should offer this basic human right to everybody that you meet, but if you will be working with this person, during the shoot and hopefully again in the future, then you should make a special effort.

First off, never touch the model. This is a cardinal rule that cannot be said enough. Some models will tell you they don’t mind you adjusting their clothing, hair, or removing a stray twig stuck to their backside. This is irrelevant. You tell the model about the clothing, the hair, and the twig. You do not touch another person you’re working with unless it is to save them from danger.

“Please” and “Thank you” go a long way. There are photographers who can get away with calling their models “rat bag”, but these are exceptional people with tons of idiosyncratic credit and talent; very few and far between. This does not apply to the likes of you and I so courtesy is always the order of the day.

Be kind, be nice, be polite.

If your model feels safe and protected, if they feel respected, if they’re comfortable, then it will show in the confidence of their poses.

Bottom line: Be nice. Be courteous. Always.

Sinopa Rin
Sinopa Rin

2. Communicate

Communication, both before and during the shoot, between the photographer and the rest of the creative team (model, make-up artist, stylist, etc.) is vital for an effective photoshoot. This post is aimed at the model, so I’ll focus on them (no pun intended).

Before the shoot you should be in regular contact with the model about the shoot. Let them know any ideas you have for the shoot. If you have no ideas at all, then let them know this too. I do this a lot.

It is my firm belief that effective pre-shoot communication reduces the risk of cancellations and no-shows. I’m not saying you should pester you model each and every day, but draw up a shoot plan together. Decide upon the location together. Check in with them a few days before to ensure that they’re ready for the shoot. Any last minute issues that may have arisen can be dealt with at this stage. It pays to keep in touch.

Bottom line: A well planned and confirmed shoot is much more likely to happen than one where you have hardly been in touch with each other.

Beau Divine
Beau Divine

3. Ask, Listen, and Involve

Take the time to involve your model in the creative process. If you are lucky enough to have a model who can help you from a technical side then grab that chance with both hands (don’t touch the model), but if not at the very least you will have somebody who is interested in creating some great photos. Models I’ve worked with have been dancers, artists, creatives, poets, fire breathers, singers, actors and photographers as well and modelling. They have life experiences to draw on, and they also have a good understanding of what looks good in a photograph. An appreciation of art is not limited to those that own cameras.

I’ve had models create mood board on Pinterest that acted as a reference for us both, before and during the shoot. I worked with a model recently who upon hearing my request for suggestions of some images to create came up with three awesome sets that we put together during the shoot. I asked, I listened to the suggestions, and we created art together; a great collaboration.

Bottom line: Every photoshoot is a collaboration. Work together for better results.

Amy Stout
Amy Stout

4. Home comforts

Take the time to ask your model is there are any snack or refreshments you could bring along to the shoot. You bringing lunch or a snack, especially if they’ll be working in an unfamiliar environment may be a great relief to them. If you’re shooting in an indoor location or studio consider bringing some music along. Ask the model what kind of music they like. I’m currently compiling a playlist of “80’s rock and pop” for a studio shoot tomorrow. The model has a fairly long journey to make tomorrow and I’m keen for he to be comfortable when she arrives. Her favourite music will help here. Very much worth the effort.

The models you work with will have varying degrees of experience. I’m sure the ones who’ve been doing this for many years will have a set routine, or be able to organise themselves, but if you’re working with a model who’s only done a handful of shoot, or possibly this is their first, then there will be things they forget. Whilst an inexperienced model is worrying about bringing the appropriate outfits, or spent all night practicing their poses in front of the mirror, they may have forgotten to bring a drink, some lunch, or even some straws to drink through – essential for not smudging lipstick. If you can bring these things along to the shoot you’ll be a hero, and you will have a grateful model. If they don’t want anything then you can eat all snacks on the way home. It’s a win-win situation.

Bottom line: A happy model is better to work with, and will work better than an unhappy one.

Lydia and Lillith
Lydia and Lillith

5. Be nice

If you are our on location, check with your model if they’re warm enough. Are you traversing a rocky outpost to reach the next location? Offer an arm for them to hold on to if they need it (never touch the model, but they can hold on to you for support if required).

I have been witness to an episode where a photographer was pressurising a model to rush her lunch.  She had a few salad leaves and radish left on her plate when his allotted time for the shoot started. He was worried about missing out on five minutes of his two hours time with her if she didn’t stop eating immediately, or at least rush the remnants of her meal. People need to eat, even models. If you allow a little leeway, show the model that their needs are important, they will work so much harder for you, and this will show in the results.

At this same photoshoot the model I was working with actually encouraged me to continue shooting even though our booked time had expired and we were technically into her lunch break. “Let’s just do five more shots … Ok, they’re really good we’ll do another five … I like these, just a few more and they’re the last ones”. I had to say to the model that we should stop and she should go and eat. I’m wondering if Mr You-Must-Finish-Eating-Now got this extra effort from his model.

I’m not suggesting that a professional model won’t work hard if you even if you are a stickler for exact timekeeping, but I am saying that if you give them some leeway, treat them well, then they’ll go that extra mile for you.

Bottom line: If the model is happy they’ll work so much harder, and you will get much better images.

A happy model
A happy model

Six month review

Last week saw the six month anniversary of my very for photo shoot working with a model. I have been somewhat lax in creating posts for each shoot, so I thought it would be fun to include some images from each of the shoots since the last one I blogged about so you can see if I’ve made any progress. I do hope to catch up with a post about each shoot with more photographs, but for now here’s one from each. Hope you like the images.

Pooley Bridge, Ullswater with Bryher.

Bryher
Bryher

Mooching about Manchester’s the Northern Quarter with Harley.

Harley Monster
Harley Monster

Spiers Old School with Sarah

Sarah Green
Sarah Green

Quarry Bank Mill with Ella

Ella Kehoe
Ella Kehoe

Home shoot with Vivian Blue

Vivian Blue
Vivian Blue

Out on location with story teller Amber

Amber Castle
Amber Castle

Fun studio shoot with Becky

Becky Kvittems
Becky Kvittems

Second shoot with Sinopa Rin, this time in Scotland

Sinopa Rin
Sinopa Rin

Trip to Largs with Katarina

Katarina Marie Mannequin
Katarina Marie Mannequin

In the woods with Meg Sarah

Meg Sarah
Meg Sarah

In the park with Louise

Louise Pierced
Louise Pierced

Pretty portraits with Enna Victoria

Enna Victoria
Enna Victoria

Back to the studio with Sinopa Rin

Sinopa Rin
Sinopa Rin

Freshfields with Lydia

Lydia Lawton
Lydia Lawton

Autumn shoot with Kes

Yes Wild
Kes Wild

On location with Leanne

Leanne
Leanne

Dance shoot with Amy

Amy Stout
Amy Stout

Rainy day indoors with Lucifera

Lucifer
Lucifer

The most beautiful of all the models I’ve worked with, my rock.

My Rock
My Rock

Fun studio shoot with Beau

Beau Divine
Beau Divine

Which brings us right up to date. My shoot with Beau was last week, and is pretty much exactly six months since my first shoot.

I have noticed the change within myself. The stuttering, nervous wreck, too afraid to shake the model’s hand is gone. I’m back. Me. The man I was a few years ago. I’ve also noticed an improvement in my photography. I feel I’ve learned more in these six months shooting with models than I have in six years of watching tutorials on YouTube or reading how-to blog posts. There really is no substitute for experience.

Can you see an improvement? I know I have much to work on, but I feel that my photography is heading in the right direction, and I’m thrilled with it.

If you like my images I would love to hear from you. Please feel free to write a comment.

Danny.

Taking action

For a while now I’ve wanted to take more portraits. Regular readers of my blog will of course notice that most portraits I post are self-portraits. Whilst this is ok to practice lighting techniques this way it is rather limiting for me, and dull for you to say the least. I’ve been considering joining one of these collaboration websites where photographers, models, make-up artists, and the like can get together to produce images. Whilst careful consideration is never a bad thing, it never actually helps you achieve anything. For achievement, action is required.

Rather than sit around and wait for opportunity to come looking for me, I joined PurplePort. This was the start. I took a couple of days to get to know the site, and how the groups and casting calls work. Deciding that the best action to get me started would be some time with a professional model; somebody with experience who knows the score and can show me the ropes. Fortunately for me, a very talented and beautiful model, Sinopa Rin is touring my local area, and will be having some time at a nearby studio. We got in touch and I’ve booked some time with Sinopa at the studio. I’m absolutely thrilled by this. Sinopa is not only a tremendous model, but also has experience on the other side of the camera. She’s offered to help me out with lighting and how to direct a model, getting good poses, and image selection. This is going to help me enormously.

I can’t expect that any of the photographs I take will be up to the standard of some of her work with other photographers, in fact I know they won’t be, but to have all that experience and knowledge available to me is just far too good an opportunity to pass up. The shoot will take place some time next month.

This isn’t where my story of action and PurplePort ends however. I have a month to wait until the planned shoot. Perhaps I could get some practice in. What, I wonder, are the chances of another amazing model crossing my path like this by chance? Slim. More action required. I found the account of a beginner part time model who lives in the same city, and was looking for some decent photographs to boost her portfolio. She wants photographs, I want to get more practice at taking them. A perfect opportunity. I took action and sent her a message, introducing myself and suggesting that we could help each other. The basic gist being that he stands in front of my camera and I press the shutter button. She gets the pictures she needs for her portfolio, and I get practice and experience directing a model and actually taking the photos. I was delighted beyond belief when she agreed. We are yet to arrange a specific date and location, but soon I will get the chance to take some portraits and you, dear reader, won’t have to suffer another self-portrait.

Action produces results. If there is something you have always wanted to do, then take action and start doing it.

In the meantime here is, yes you guessed it, another self-portrait.

Mmmmmmwah!

Mmmmmmmwah!